'I am simply a 'book drunkard.' Books have the same irresistible temptation for me that liquor has for its devotee. I cannot withstand them.' L.M. Montgomery

'There are no faster or firmer friendships than those formed between people who love the same books.' Irving Stone



Saturday, August 10, 2013

Saturday Snapshots

I live in the mailing jurisdiction of the city of Beaver Falls, in Beaver County. I drive by our post office many times a week and have gone in those front doors many, many times. Just the other day I noticed at the top of those wonderful old lights on the front of the building sits a beaver! So much for my powers of observation! I've always admired this plain old post office built in 1937 with funds from the New Deal.


 


Inside is another little treasure. A mural 'The Armistice Letter' painted by Eugene Higgins in 1938 and funded by New Deal Agencies: Treasury of the Fine Arts



Here's a link to the New Deal Art RegistryThe New Deal Art Registry enlists art sleuths around the country to collaborate in compiling a reliable, web-based, visual guide to surviving public art that was created in the 1930s and 40s under any of the New Deal programs. A fun look around the history of our country in this period thru art!

Who knew I had this lovely piece of American history right here in my backyard! Walked into it many times and never even thought about the history of it. Lesson learned: Slow down and look around, never know what you might be missing!

A quote I love from Ann Voskamp:
'Hurry always empties the soul'

This post is linked to Saturday Snapshot which originates @ At Home With Books. For the summer Melinda @ West Metro Mommy Reads is hosting this fun meme. Click on Saturday Snapshot link to add your photo or see what everyone else is sharing!

Peggy Ann

26 comments:

  1. Great advice, Peggy Ann...I think that most of us, in the hustle and bustle of our lives, often overlook the treasures in our own backyards.

    Thanks for sharing...and for visiting my blog. Love your "About Me," the "Book Drunkard." LOL

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    1. I am always in a hurry, Laurel. It's a big reminder to me!

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  2. Love those little beavers! Wonder whose idea it was to incorporate then into the building design - I bet they were smiling when they did! And love the mural as well!

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    1. I'm glad they did, Sharon. It is fun!

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  3. That beaver is so sweet! I wonder how many other people never noticed it!

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    1. I bet not many have, Patty. We hurry and scurry all the time.

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  4. How fascinating. One of the things I love about Saturday Snapshot is the way I get to see and learn about places so far away, which I will never visit. Thank you for visiting my blog

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    1. I love the little peeks into peoples lives we get on Saturday, Christine!

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  5. Yay for the beavers! (My name means "beaver meadow" or "dweller in the beaver meadow"--so I collect beavers)

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  6. Great reminder, Peggy for all of us to slow down and smell the roses :-)
    Roosevelt's New Deal was a fascintaing period in your history - I didn't realise public art was part of that scheme as well.

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    1. Me either, Brona. It was a fascinating period and a very difficult time in our history.

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  7. I love that little beaver. It is neat that bits of history you can run across if you're paying attention.

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  8. What fun to discover that little beaver and the New Deal artwork. I love the idea that creative people could be funded by the government.

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    1. I was amazed when I read that Paulita!

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  9. Thanks for the link to the registry. I didn't know such a thing existed. Hopefully all the known works will be preserved. We have lots of New Deal Art in Illinois and there is even one in my town post office.

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    1. Your welcome Leslie. I didn't know about this really until I was trying to find the year the post office was built and came across it. Now I will keep my eye out for this art as we travel around!

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    2. I'm fascinated by this. I'm going to have to take my camera and get photos of these. I looked up the ones on the list in my area and many are in post offices. I can only wonder how many didn't survive -- we are so obsessed with tearing down the old and constructing new stuff.

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    3. I'll be watching Saturday Snapshots for your pics!

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  10. I love those beavers, too. I guess I'm no more observant than you are because one of the two places listed for Philadelphia is the post office I have to go to to pick up packages if the postman misses me. I've never noticed the painting that's supposed to be there. Now, instead of cursing missing the postman, I'll look forward to picking up the next package!

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    1. I know, Joan, I looked at the painting and never gave it a thought or registered it in my mind really. Noticing the beavers made me look at the post office differently

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  11. What a great post, we can make a trip to the post office interesting if we try.... I'm sure every trip there now will be better for you now, you'll be checking on those beavers, and having a quick look at that painting. Thanks for the reminder to enjoy the ordinary, that is one of my favourite things to do.

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    1. Your welcome Louise! Have a great week!

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