'I am simply a 'book drunkard.' Books have the same irresistible temptation for me that liquor has for its devotee. I cannot withstand them.' L.M. Montgomery

'There are no faster or firmer friendships than those formed between people who love the same books.' Irving Stone



Sunday, June 17, 2012

Weekend Cooking with Beth Fish Reads

I purchased a bottle of Scotch Whiskey one day, after reading a John Dickson Carr book set in Scotland and they were always pouring a dram and I got a bug and had to have some. It will of course take me forever to use the whole bottle, so my dear Scottish friend Katrina said, 'use it in cooking', and she sent me this recipe. It was very easy to make and it was delicious. It only took a couple tbsp. of whiskey though so I'll have to make it often:) If your looking for something simple and elegant to serve for friends, this is it. Of course I have no idea the proper pronunciation of cranachan, you'll just have to wing it! Speaking of pronunciation, check out Katrina's Scottish Words posts! 

This recipe is from a BBC website, but I appreciate how they put the metric and the standard for those of us that don't use metric. Here is the link to the websight...

 

Isn't it pretty?

 

Raspberry cranachan

Preparation method

  1. Toast the oatmeal in a dry frying pan, tossing occasionally, until golden brown. Leave to cool.
  2. If using the raspberry jam this can be used to flavour the cream or it can be dribbled through the cranachan warm. Dissolve the jam in the water. Once the jam has dissolved, strain through a tea strainer/sieve. This now has a 'jam coulis' consistency.
  3. Whisk the double cream, caster sugar and whisky together until lightly whipped. Fold in the toasted oatmeal. Divide half of the raspberries between four glasses. Spoon a little of the 'jam coulis', if using, or liqueur, if using, on top of each.
  4. Half-fill each glass with cranachan cream mixture before sitting the remaining raspberries on top. Spoon more 'jam coulis' or liqueur on top of the raspberries before topping and finishing with the cranachan mix. Smooth the top of each cranachan cream.
  5. To finish, dust each pudding with icing sugar before serving. The pudding can be eaten immediately or refrigerated until needed. Only dust with icing sugar when ready to eat.


    This post is linked to Weekend Cooking @ Beth Fish Reads


12 comments:

  1. Ooooh - that does look delicious! I shall have to try it.

    p.s. I know what you mean about reading a book and then deciding you need the food mentioned in it. Happens to me all the time!

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  2. this sounds great - I don't like whiskey so I would probably substitute brandy for it. Have a great week.

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  3. It looks fab, I wish I could have tasted some! Thanks for the mention, the pronunciation of cranachan is: CRA-na-chan and all of the 'a's are sounded like the one in 'pass', the 'ch' sound is as in the word 'loch'. Yes it's that clearing your throat sound again!
    If you put ingredients which you want to use into the search box on the BBC food site it should come up with recipes which have those things in them. It might come up with more suggestions for using your whisky.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Katrina for the pronunciation! Not sure I'll ever get the CH sound down right, I think you have to be Scottish to do that! I'm thinking maybe some fudge with whiskey in it?

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    2. Fudge would certainly be worth trying, any time I've had whisky flavoured fudge I've thought it didn't taste very whisky-ish. Could be a plus!

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  4. What a great use of the whiskey, your dessert looks so good! I totally get the craving after reading, now I'd like some cranachan :)

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  5. Oh wow this sounds good because it uses oats, raspberries, and whiskey! Yummm. I've never had cranachan, but I'm definitely going to try it just as soon as it's raspberry season.

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  6. I made a recipe something like this many years ago, before i could legally buy alcohol. Looks like a good choice to serve company. I"m not a scotch drinker at all, there is something about it that disagrees with me. Some sort of intolerance or allergy. Oh well, at least hubby doesn't have to worry about me drinking his bottle when he's out.

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    Replies
    1. It is strong Heather. Carole suggested subbing brandy.

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  7. It is gorgeous! I'm trying to imagine the taste and now I'm starving for something sweet. I don't keep very liquor at my house but I wonder if I have something that I might be able to substitute. Thanks for sharing!

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    Replies
    1. It is surprisingly not real sweet, Trish, other than the sweetness of the berries. Has only 1 tsp. sugar in it! Carole suggested using brandy as she doesn't like whiskey I would imagine you could use rum too.

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    2. You could try sherry, port or even rose wine for a more fruity flavour.

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