'I am simply a 'book drunkard.' Books have the same irresistible temptation for me that liquor has for its devotee. I cannot withstand them.' L.M. Montgomery

'There are no faster or firmer friendships than those formed between people who love the same books.' Irving Stone



Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Wondrous Words Wednesday



Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where we share new (to us) words that we’ve encountered in our reading. It is hosted by Kathy over at BermudaOnion's Weblog. If you've come across an interesting word or three this week in your reading, run on over to BermudaOnion's and grab the button, write a post and link up at her blog!




 
My words are from 'Bryant & May off the Rails' by Christopher Fowler

'Give it glasses, false teeth and a hearing aid, and a wispy band of white hair arranged in a straggling tonsure.'    pg. 19
 
tonsure
1. the act or process of cutting the hair, especially as a religious rite or custom.
2. the shaved part of the head, usually the crown, of a member of a religious order. — tonsorial, adj.



'A framed photograph of a girl with long blond hair and blue eyes, vacuous to the point of derangement.'   pg. 22

vac·u·ous  adj.
1. Devoid of matter; empty.
2.
a. Lacking intelligence; stupid.
b. Devoid of substance or meaning; inane: a vacuous comment.
c. Devoid of expression; vacant: "The narrow, swinelike eyes were open, no more vacuous in death than they had been in life" (Nicholas Proffitt).
3. Lacking serious purpose or occupation; idle. See Synonyms at empty.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

'It's an instinct, but Mr. Fox has turned it into an art. And this solipsism ultimately blinds him.'    pg. 33

sol·ip·sism  n. Philosophy
1. The theory that the self is the only thing that can be known and verified.
2. The theory or view that the self is the only reality.
 
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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What new or interesting words did you find this week? Leave me a link so I can check them out!

7 comments:

  1. I didn't realize there was a specific word for the bald spot on friars/monks! I guess there's a word for pretty much everything. lol. Thanks for sharing. If you get a chance, my words are here.

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  2. I knew tonsure, I think it was used in Pillars of the Earth, but anyway it's Latin-based and I get most of those words.
    Solipsism I've heard (and heard defined) several times, but still have a hard time trying to understand it.
    Thanks for sharing, and thanks for visiting my blog!

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  3. Great words today. I've always loved vacuous. I did solipsism only recently, but it's one of those slippery words that I always forget no matter how many times I look it up. I have vague notions that I've come across tonsure before, but could never have defined it.

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  4. tonsure I knew so feel just a mite smart.. the other two are new to me.My words are linked too now...

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  5. Glad to finally know what solipsism means; I'd seen it a few times. I knew the other two--in my church, we still tonsure people! And vacuous is an old favorite, along with its cousin, vapid.

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  6. I've looked up tonsure before and remembered it when I read the sentence you found it in. I don't think I've ever used it before. Thanks for playing along!

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  7. Hi Peggy,

    The only word that I wasn't too sure about was 'Tonsure'. It is not a pretty word, although to be fair, it describes a not very pretty sight, so is probably quite apt.

    I really must get around to trying this series of books, as I have read several good reviews about them.

    The only problem is, that the names of Bryant and May, always make me want to smile, although being English maybe that is exactly what the author wanted. Bryant and May were a well known brand of matches over here many years ago now,so I guess that the irony and satire is reflected in these popular stories.

    Great post, thanks Peggy.

    Happy Thanksgiving.

    Yvonne

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